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BA/BS in Computer Science

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Digital, mobile, big data, automotive and electronics companies alike all require the technical savvy and varied skillset of computer scientists. In fact, employers in virtually every field rely on them to solve complex network, database and optimization issues, and keep them connected, productive and safe from cyber threats.

Program Overview

Leaders in digital exploration and discovery

As the world becomes more digital, the need for savvy and skilled computer science professionals is increasing in every industry. Depending on your professional goals, we offer two different computer science degree programs: a bachelor of science or a bachelor of arts. You’ll determine which path is right for you with the guidance of our faculty.

If you’re interested in computer design, building and internal architecture, in addition to computer programming, our BS program will give you the tools for a successful career. Your course work will cover a host of topics — from web development and data structures to cryptography, artificial intelligence and robotics. This knowledge paves the way for you to build a successful career as a software developer, systems analyst, network administrator among many other careers.

Rather than purchasing text books, students in Professor Jonathan Blake's robotics class order robots that they learn to program to complete desired tasks.

Programming futures

Rather than purchasing text books, students in Professor Jonathan Blake's robotics class order robots that they learn to program to complete desired tasks.

The BA degree takes a more holistic, interprofessional approach to the application of computer science. You’ll learn the same fundamental concepts and techniques, but also how to apply them to other subject areas, such as business, biology, graphic design and game design. The bachelor of arts degree is designed to be flexible, allowing you to complete an additional major or minor.

Through either degree program, you’ll become proficient with leading industry hardware and software systems. Our on-campus computer science labs feature state-of-the-art equipment, hosting four unique internal networks. We will provide you with access to systems running Windows and Linux to acclimate you to different operating systems and working environments.

Stephen White, husband of Kimberly DiGiovanni, right, listens as Gianna Mancini points to the laptop they're using to build an application called "Fellowship Weekly." Amara Forstrom, right, watches under Debbie Cook. They worked at the Rocky Top Student Center, Saturday, March 25, 2017. Quinnipiac hosted its second annual Girl Scouts Hackathon. Students, many from Quinnipiac volunteered in conjunction with the Girl Scouts of Connecticut and Random Hacks of Kindness, Jr. Girl Scouts built mobile apps for local non-profits.

Girl Scouts develop mobile apps

Mobile apps are relied upon by people all over the world for everything from record-keeping and budgeting to reaching consumers. To develop one, all anyone needs are coding skills and a great idea, something 50 Girl Scouts learned at the second annual Quinnipiac Girl Scouts Hackathon, held on the York Hill Campus.

The girls split off into teams to develop mobile apps for a non-profit organizations that had been assigned to them. Under the guidance of Quinnipiac student mentors, they interviewed organization reps to ascertain their needs, and then built their app with Appinventor, an easy to use web tool used by professionals for making Android-based mobile applications.

“These kids were dropped off in the morning as mobile users. When they were picked up that afternoon, they were mobile inventors,” said computer science professor Jon Blake. “It was just incredible to see their parent’s reactions.”

Facilities

Quinnipiac engineering student Jim Webb competes in the bi-annual hackathon Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016 in the Center for Communications and Engineering at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Connecticut. Students formed teams and built an application for mobile or web with a focus on health and wellness.

Hackers wanted

Jim Webb builds an application for mobile or web with a focus on health and wellness as part of the Hackathon in 2016.

Whether you're interested in developing mobile apps or have the next great idea for a new netwrok, our facilities and labs will give you the experience you need to fulfill your dreams. Learning on the latest technologies will help you make a seamless transition from student to professional with an edge over the competition that can only be gained with hands-on experience.

Visit our centers and resources page to learn more about our facilities and how you'll learn everything you need to know to become a leader in your field.

Curriculum and Requirements: Bachelor of Arts

BA in Computer Science Curriculum

Note: a minimum grade of C- is required for all computer science course prerequisites unless otherwise stated.

University Curriculum
Foundations of Inquiry:
FYS 101First Year Seminar3
EN 101Introduction to Academic Reading and Writing3
EN 102Academic Writing and Research3
Quantitative Literacy:
MA 205Introduction to Discrete Mathematics (CSC 205)3
Disciplinary Inquiry:
Take four UC courses from within Sciences (with lab), Humanities, Social Sciences, Fine Arts: 113
Personal Inquiry I:
Take three UC courses from within Sciences, Humanities, Social Sciences, Fine Arts 19-10
Personal Inquiry II:
Choose one of the following: 23
MA 141
Calculus of a Single Variable I
MA 229
Linear Algebra
Take additional UC credits (the mathematics elective below could count) 45-9
Additional Requirements:
MA elective 53
ENR 395Professional Development Seminar1
Directed Study
Complete minimum 18 credits of approved directed study outside Computer Science 618
Computer Science Core Requirements
CSC 110
& 110L
Programming and Problem Solving
and Programming and Problem Solving Lab
4
CSC 111
& 111L
Data Structures and Abstraction
and Data Structures & Abstraction Lab
4
SER 120
& 120L
Object-Oriented Design and Programming
and Object-Oriented Design and Programming Lab
4
CSC 210
& 210L
Computer Architecture and Organization
and Computer Architecture and Organization Lab
4
CSC 215Algorithm Design and Analysis3
CSC 225Introduction to Software Development (SER 225)3
CSC 493 Senior Thesis 11
CSC 494 Senior Thesis 23
CSC Electives (Take 9 credits of CSC elective courses) 39
Total Credits99-104
1

Courses must be from different areas.

2

Counts in this category only if MA 141 is taken.

3

Can be a software engineering elective (SER 210 or any 300-level or above SER course). 

4

Must meet a minimum of 18 credits in Personal Inquiry I & II.

5

Must be MA 140 or higher

6

A minor or second major will satisfy this requirement

Complete additional course work to reach 120 credits. This course work must include any missing UC credits from Personal Inquiry above.

Additional course details
Explore descriptions, schedule and instructor information using the Course Finder tool.

Curriculum and Requirements: Bachelor of Science

BS in Computer Science Curriculum

Note: a minimum grade of C- is required for all computer science course prerequisites unless otherwise stated.

University Curriculum
Foundations of Inquiry:
FYS 101First Year Seminar3
EN 101Introduction to Academic Reading and Writing3
EN 102Academic Writing and Research3
Quantitative Literacy:
MA 205Introduction to Discrete Mathematics (CSC 205)3
Disciplinary Inquiry:
Take one of the following Natural Science courses: 14
BIO 101
& 101L
General Biology I
and General Biology I Lab
BIO 150
& 150L
General Biology for Majors
and General Biology for Majors Laboratory
PHY 121
University Physics
CHE 110
& 110L
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Lab
Humanities, Social Sciences, Fine Arts: 29
Personal Inquiry I:
Take second semester of Natural Science course chosen above 14
Take two additional courses from within Humanities, Social Sciences, Fine Arts 26
Personal Inquiry II:
Choose one of the following:3-4
MA 141
Calculus of a Single Variable I
MA 151
Calculus I
Take an additional 4-5 UC credits (the mathematics elective below could count) 45
Additional Requirements:
MA 229Linear Algebra3
MA electives (take 5-6 additional credits) 55-6
Additional Math/Science courses 67
ENR 395Professional Development Seminar1
Computer Science Core Requirements
CSC 110
& 110L
Programming and Problem Solving
and Programming and Problem Solving Lab
4
CSC 111
& 111L
Data Structures and Abstraction
and Data Structures & Abstraction Lab
4
SER 120
& 120L
Object-Oriented Design and Programming
and Object-Oriented Design and Programming Lab
4
CSC 210
& 210L
Computer Architecture and Organization
and Computer Architecture and Organization Lab
4
CSC 215Algorithm Design and Analysis3
CSC 225Introduction to Software Development (SER 225)3
CSC 310Operating Systems and Systems Programming3
CSC 315Theory of Computation (MA 315)3
Take one of the following:3
CSC 325
Database Systems (SER 325)
CSC 340
Networking and Distributed Processing
CSC 491Senior Project 13
CSC 492Senior Project 23
CSC Electives (Take 9 credits of CSC elective courses) 39
Total Credits105-107
1

Must take the full-year sequence.

2

Courses must be from different areas.

3

Can be a software engineering elective (SER 210 or any 300-level or above SER course). 

4

Must meet a minimum of 18 credits in Personal Inquiry I & II.

5

Total math credits must equal a minimum of 15.

6

Total math/science credits must equal a minimum of 30.

Complete additional course work to reach 120 credits. This course work must include any missing UC credits from Personal Inquiry above.

Additional course details
Explore descriptions, schedule and instructor information using the Course Finder tool.