Overview

Engineering students and faculty in the spotlight

Our students and faculty are accomplishing great things. Below, you'll find some of their work and achievements. This page will be updated frequently as their accomplishments continue to roll in.

Madison Gegeckas ’17 constructs a shaft on a prototype machine that will assist workers in Guatemala to use bottles filled with shredded trash to make eco bricks used to build schools and houses.

Building bright futures

Madison Gegeckas ’17 constructs a shaft on a prototype machine that will assist workers in Guatemala to use bottles filled with shredded trash to make eco bricks used to build schools and houses.

Eco Bricks for Guatemala

Students’ initiative to help build schools

When mechanical engineering student Chris Monferrato heard that a Quinnipiac alumnus needed help building schools for poor communities in Central America, he knew he had found the perfect senior capstone project.

The alumnus — Frank Sherrill ’07 — a political science graduate living in Guatemala, has been working with others to build “bottle schools,” structures that replace traditional cinder blocks with plastic bottles that community members stuff with non-organic garbage. They are called “eco bricks.”

The foundations, columns and beams for the buildings are made of reinforced concrete; eco bricks are attached to a metal frame and anchored with chicken wire to fill the space between structural elements. The purpose is twofold: the schools are cheaper to construct than their traditional counterparts, and Guatemala’s notorious garbage problem is addressed in the process. But one issue Sherrill has encountered is the amount of time it takes workers to fill the bottles.

Quinnipiac hosted our second annual Girl Scouts Hackathon. Many Quinnipiac students volunteered in conjunction with the Girl Scouts of Connecticut and Random Hacks of Kindness, Jr. to build mobile apps for area non-profits.

Hands-on learning

Quinnipiac hosted our second annual Girl Scouts Hackathon. Many Quinnipiac students volunteered in conjunction with the Girl Scouts of Connecticut and Random Hacks of Kindness, Jr. to build mobile apps for area non-profits.

Mike Austin '20 volunteered to guide a group of Girl Scouts during a hackathon held on the York Hill Campus. The event had the girls work in teams of five to design and develop a mobile app for the benefit of a specific non-profit organization that had been assigned to them. It’s an example of some of the ways engineering students can get involved in projects with impact.

Cracking the code

Mike Austin '20 volunteered to guide a group of Girl Scouts during a hackathon held on the York Hill Campus. The event had the girls work in teams of five to design and develop a mobile app for the benefit of a specific non-profit organization that had been assigned to them. It’s an example of some of the ways engineering students can get involved in projects with impact.

Girl Scouts guided through hackathon

Mobile phone technology — and the coding skills required to develop it — can serve a greater purpose than simply feeding our gaming and social media habits. This was what 50 Girl Scouts learned at the second annual Quinnipiac Girl Scouts Hackathon, held on our York Hill Campus.

The event had the girls work in teams of five to design and develop a mobile app for the benefit of a specific non-profit organization that had been assigned to them. The teams interviewed organization representatives to gauge their needs for a hypothetical project, giving them the experience of being real consultants.

Each team was also assigned a Quinnipiac student to serve as a mentor to help with the initial meeting, lead them through design exercises, techniques and processes and help them transition from the design phase to the coding phase.

Learn more

Virtual reality simulation developed to help prevent patient-drops

A team of Quinnipiac students and faculty have developed a virtual reality simulation that teaches patient-transfer techniques to future health care professionals. The program addresses both patient and health care providers: it aims to reduce the risk of dropping a patient during a transfer and reduce the risk of lower back injury among the health care provider lifting the patient.

“We were looking for a high-impact project that addressed actual problems,” said nursing professor Karen Myrick. “We found out that back injuries take the most nurses and physical therapists out of the workforce. The idea grew from there, and morphed into a major initiative.”

The simulation tracks a user’s movements through a virtual hospital setting that mimics the most common patient-transfer situations. It is customizable and offers users real-time feedback as to their posture and lifting technique. The simulation is also fully autonomous, enabling faculty to engage with students in other ways.

The project, made possible by The Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, required the collaborative expertise of students and faculty from 6 disciplines across the College of Arts and Sciences and Schools of Engineering, Health Sciences and Nursing: biomedical science, computer science, game design, industrial engineering, nursing and physical therapy.

Learn more
Joe Huberman experiments with the virtual reality program developed during an interprofessional event at the Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences on our North Haven Campus.

Experiential learning

Joe Huberman experiments with the virtual reality program developed during an interprofessional event at the Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences on our North Haven Campus.

Photo Gallery: Bottle Rockets

Publications / Journals

Advancements in the field

When they aren’t shaping young engineers in the classroom, our professors are active in their field, and engaged in their own important research. Our faculty are practicing engineers who regularly showcase their work at conferences, sit on panels and publish in a variety of research journals.

Engineering faculty are mentors who lead by example. They advise, guide and encourage students to pursue meaningful undergraduate research and independent study that leads to reports, presentations and even publications of their own.

 

Directing and learning

Quinnipiac University engineering professor John Greenleaf with students discussing how to perform percolation tests on the Mount Carmel Campus.

Journals and Magazines


  • Applied Ergonomics
  • Computers & Operations Research
  • IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering
  • The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety
  • Journal of Bridge Engineering
  • Journal of Hydrologic Engineering
  • Journal of Supercomputing
  • Materials and Structures
  • Methods of Information in Medicine
  • Sustainability

Books


  • The Heroku Cookbook (Packt Publishing)

Rachel Davis '18 works on the modified car she created for a toddler with cerebral palsy.

Developing solutions and removing obstacles

Rachel Davis '18 works on the modified car she created for a toddler with cerebral palsy.

Go-Baby-Go Modified Car

Innovation that matters

Independent research projects are more than just requirements in the School of Engineering; they present you with the opportunity to engage in, and take credit for truly impactful work. Our students built Quinnipiac University’s first web-based weather service, and created a mobile app that helps busy parents manage their work-life balance. They’ve built diagnostic training devices, developed processes that increase patient care efficiency in operating rooms, and designed systems that more effectively manage surgical supply inventories in hospitals.

Rachel Davis, ME ’16, used her QUIP-RS research project to give the gift of mobility to a toddler stricken with cerebral palsy. In conjunction with “Go-Baby-Go,” a nationwide program that donates modified toy cars to children with mobility needs, Rachel worked on a project that modified a ride-on electric toy car so that it could be controlled by child who could not move his arms or legs.

Quinnipiac senior Rachel Davis, a pre-med and engineering major, watches Nolan Green test out his modified car Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016, on Quinnipiac's Mount Carmel campus. Nolan, 3, was born with cerebral palsy. The car is equipped with a system that allows him to control the car’s speed and steering through an accelerometer attached to his head. It also has a remote control. Davis and professors Jose Riofrio, Rose Flammang and Michelle Broggi, partnering with The GoBabyGo! initiative, spent countless hours outfitting the car to meet Nolan's needs.

Engaged in work that makes a difference

Rachel Davis's research project reinforced the School of Engineering's mission of meeting the world's challenges head-on.


While the car could be operated by remote control, accelerometers attached to a small cap measured the head’s tilt in both directions, enabling the three-year-old to control the car simply by moving his head: the up-and-down motion changed speeds, while side-to-side controlled steering.

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