School of Engineering

Overview

Don’t just change the world — make it

An education in our School of Engineering prepares you to face the technological, scientific and logistical obstacles of the 21st century. Through an interdisciplinary approach that combines heavy collaboration, hands-on learning and cutting-edge facilities, we’ll teach you to be both expert and innovator, builder and technician, as well as creative thinker.

Our faculty members are practicing engineers who are passionate about what they do, and also about inspiring that passion in their students. Under their guidance, and alongside dedicated peers from other engineering backgrounds, you’ll do more than solve the same complex problems. You’ll develop new solutions.

We emphasize innovation, safety and sustainability in each of our programs. Moreover, you'll have ample opportunities to put these values into practice. Special partnership programs, internships with top manufacturers and service trips across the globe are just a few ways you'll bridge the gap from engineer-in-training to engineer-in-practice. They are also examples of resources that help you spark an exciting career.

The tools are all here. It's time to put them to use.

Faculty

Professor Priscilla Fonseca works with civil engineering students to evaluate many different types of building materials.

Strong connections

Professor Priscilla Fonseca works with civil engineering students to evaluate many different types of building materials.

Field innovators and classroom mentors

Our faculty have earned advanced degrees from many of the nation’s top engineering graduate programs, and bring decades of combined industry experience plus a collective passion for education to the classroom. Acting as academic advisers, coaches and mentors, they oversee their students’ transformation into professionals, leaders and lifelong learners.

Our faculty do more than teach you modern engineering theories, practices and technology. They inspire you to see beyond field conventions and think of innovative ways to make their communities safer, stronger and more sustainable.

Professor Priscilla Fonseca, whose specialty is structural analysis and design, quite literally “breaks” conventions. In her civil engineering material course, she shows her students how alternative, sustainable construction materials can build better, stronger infrastructure, tools and consumer products.

As a collaborative project, she and her students constructed fiber-reinforced concrete bowling balls. Steel, glass and nylon fibers proved to be more economical, labor saving, and easier to transport than traditional steel rebar – and just as reliable. The project was a success, and just one example of how our students get to examine and conquer the same challenges faced by licensed engineers.

By the Numbers

100%


Success Rate

Percentage of School of Engineering Class of 2016 graduates working or in graduate education programs

53.9%


Future Hires

Percentage of businesses that plan to hire computer science degree holders in 2016 (National Association of Colleges and Employers)

$64,891


Average Salary

Average salary for graduates with engineering degrees in 2016 (National Association of Colleges and Employers)

Civil engineering students perform a compression test on bowling balls that they constructed out of fiber-reinforced concrete. Made from a combination of concrete, glass and nylon fibers, the balls are more economical and less labor intensive to create, easier to transport and bowled just as straight as traditional ones. Nylon is also more malleable and easier to work with than conventional steel rebar.

Putting skills to the test

Civil engineering students perform a compression test on bowling balls that they constructed out of fiber-reinforced concrete. Made from a combination of concrete, glass and nylon fibers, the balls are more economical and less labor intensive to create, easier to transport and bowled just as straight as traditional ones. Nylon is also more malleable and easier to work with than conventional steel rebar.

Accreditation

Recognized among the best

Our mechanical, civil, industrial and software engineering programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, meaning they meet the highest standards of engineering education in the country. Through exposure to existing and emerging technologies, interdisciplinary projects and innovative practices, we prepare our graduates to lead the way in the most critical engineering fields. They also learn to anticipate the many needs of a growing society, and how to fulfill them with the highest standards of quality, safety and precision.

Programs at a Glance

World-class programs for a growing engineering landscape

Transportation, software development, renewable energies and optimization — the world of engineering is multifaceted, offering many specialties and career paths. Which path speaks to your talents and professional goals? Quinnipiac offers bachelor’s degree programs in four of the fastest growing engineering fields — mechanical, civil, industrial and software — as well as in computer science. 

Each program grounds you first in theory, then builds technical proficiency through both independent and interdisciplinary projects. Classrooms are small, student-centered and emphasize interactive learning with the same powerful software, machinery and materials used by professional engineers and computer scientists. We also place great emphasis on preparing you for the FE (Fundamentals of Engineering) certificate, which you'll earn during your senior year. The first of the NCEES exams, the FE certificate represents the first major step toward becoming a licensed engineer.

Our goal is not only to make you indispensable to a variety of industries, but a vital asset to any community you live and work in. You’ll gain necessary field experience through internships with nationally recognized companies, while humanitarian trips and service learning opportunities afford you the experience of using your skills for the benefit of society, and those less fortunate. 

School and Campus Life

Collaborate, explore and make a difference

Regardless of discipline, the School of Engineering is an inclusive community of equally driven and curious professionals who share the same passion for hands-on learning.

The Quinnipiac University Student Engineering Organization (QUESO) raises engineering awareness through various yearly events and community engagement projects. QUESO additionally holds networking events that bring together alumni, students, faculty and employers. 

Engineering students participate in other events that are at once creative, competitive and collaborative. The computer science program’s High School Programming Competition bring teams of students together to excite future programmers, while the Annual Hackathon focuses on a variety of topics, including the development of Android apps. The program is aimed at helping the kids improve their math skills, tell time and build stronger vocabularies. Off campus, students from all of our degree areas have exceled at competitions such as the CT Tech Challenge, and successfully represented Quinnipiac at the ASEE Northeast conference.

Students also regularly lend their knowledge and expertise to humanitarian projects and educational initiatives of other campus-based organizations, such as the Bristol-Meyers Squibb Center for Science Teaching and Learning, SLATE and the Albert Schweitzer Institute.

Engineering student Dan Dresselhouse ’20 receives his hard hat during the annual ceremony. The ceremony is a beloved tradition where upper class students welcome newer students to the fold.

Joining a legacy

Engineering student Dan Dresselhouse ’20 receives his hard hat during the annual ceremony. The ceremony is a beloved tradition where upper class students welcome newer students to the fold.

Small classes and collaborative learning will allow you to build robust relationships with your peers that will last long after completing your degree. These 10 engineering students celebrated their friendships and accomplishments at Winnisquam Lake in central New Hampshire over the summer shortly after graduation.

Lifelong connections

Small classes and collaborative learning will allow you to build robust relationships with your peers that will last long after completing your degree. These 10 engineering students celebrated their friendships and accomplishments at Winnisquam Lake in central New Hampshire over the summer shortly after graduation.

Engineering faculty take on students in the third annual soccer game in April 2017 on the York Hill Campus.

A tradition of friendly competition

Engineering faculty take on students in the third annual soccer game in April 2017 on the York Hill Campus.

Madison Gegeckas ’17 engineers a shaft for a machine that will assist workers in Guatemala create “eco bricks.” Part of a mechanical engineering student’s capstone project, the bricks replace traditional cinder blocks with environmentally friendly bricks made from plastic bottles and shredded, non-organic trash.

Creative solutions

Madison Gegeckas ’17 engineers a shaft for a machine that will assist workers in Guatemala create “eco bricks.” Part of a mechanical engineering student’s capstone project, the bricks replace traditional cinder blocks with environmentally friendly bricks made from plastic bottles and shredded, non-organic trash.

Centers and Resources

Dynamic and interactive learning environments

Engineers don’t master their craft by sitting behind desks. If Quinnipiac students aren’t engaged in projects and fieldwork off campus, they are honing their skills in any of the active classrooms, workshops and laboratories located on it.

The School of Engineering’s spacious and modern facilities epitomize experiential and collaborative learning, and are designed to accommodate both solo projects and large group work. With all of the state-of-the-art tools and resources of a practicing engineer at their disposal, from fully operational production lines to high-definition 3D printers and high-powered laser cutters, students of each engineering discipline are presented with numerous opportunities to design and build, or analyze and explore. 

Centers and Resources
School of Engineering. Copyright Notice: Rich Gilligan @Hello Artists photographed in Spring 2016 for the new branding materials and new EDU website. Usage terms are: Marketing Collateral in perpetuity - e.g.-student guides, annual reports, flyers, brochures, public affairs, web/social media
- 3 years paid media.,School of Engineering. Copyright Notice: Rich Gilligan @Hello Artists photographed in Spring 2016 for the new branding materials and new EDU website. Usage terms are: Marketing Collateral in perpetuity - e.g.-student guides, annual reports, flyers, brochures, public affairs, web/social media
- 3 years paid media.,School of Engineering. Copyright Notice: Rich Gilligan @Hello Artists photographed in Spring 2016 for the new branding materials and new EDU website. Usage terms are: Marketing Collateral in perpetuity - e.g.-student guides, annual reports, flyers, brochures, public affairs, web/social media
- 3 years paid media.,School of Engineering. Copyright Notice: Rich Gilligan @Hello Artists photographed in Spring 2016 for the new branding materials and new EDU website. Usage terms are: Marketing Collateral in perpetuity - e.g.-student guides, annual reports, flyers, brochures, public affairs, web/social media
- 3 years paid media.

Tools of the trade

Powerful 3-D printers and other equipment enable students to bring their ideas and model designs to life.

Our Work

Engineering know-how meets world impact

The School of Engineering is built upon an academic culture of doing, and students here love what they do. In addition to preparing themselves for rewarding careers, they have the opportunity to use their knowledge and hands-on expertise to improve communities and educate younger generations both at home, and around the world.

Partnerships with nonprofit organizations, such as Habitat for Humanity, offer engineering students the opportunity to use their skills to aid displaced families. They also have the opportunity to participate in STEM-related education projects with local schools, in conjunction with the Bristol-Meyers Squibb Center for Science Teaching and Learning.

Take the Next Step