Nursing professor hopes to use fellowship as means of improving student preparation

Professor Laima Karosas, second from the right, is the first Quinnipiac professor to be inducted as a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing Practitioners. She is photographed here with her sponsors.

Recognized as among the best

Professor Laima Karosas, second from the right, is the first Quinnipiac professor to be inducted as a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing Practitioners. She is photographed here with her sponsors.

P

rofessor Laima Karosas' job has extended far beyond simply teaching the clinical and interpersonal skills of her profession during her 15 years on the faculty of our School of Nursing.

As the current chairperson of gradute programs, she has implemented numerous changes that have enhanced student and faculty experiences, improved program curriculums and outcomes, and helped graduating nurses secure better job placements and fellowship opportunities.

“When change is needed, we always figure it out,” Karosas said. “When we beat our own expectations and we see that reflected in the success of our students, it is incredibly gratifying.”

Ashlyn Delbone, a student in the Accelerated BS in Nursing program in the School of Nursing, learns pediatric respiratory care Tuesday, June 20, 2017, in the Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences on Quinnipiac’s North Haven Campus

Your future starts here

Nursing students attend classes in the Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, a state-of-the-art building with sophisticated labs and cutting-edge simulation technology that create real-life work settings.

Her decades of contribution to health policy and nursing education have not gone unnoticed. On June 22, Karosas became the first Quinnipiac faculty member to be inducted as a fellow in to the American Academy of Nursing Practitioners, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The AANP is a professional organization and think tank that examines efficacy of health policy and practice, and advances them for the benefit of the public and the nursing profession.

Karosas views her induction as more of an opportunity than an individual honor. She said she plans to leverage the AANPs vast network of information and resources toward keeping pace with an evolving profession, and advancing the School of Nursing’s mission of transforming health care, one student at a time.

“We have very high standards here,” Karosas said.  “This is another thing that will force us to continually evaluate what we are teaching, and prepare our students to jump right into practice.”